Physics Colloquium, Fall 2018

Thursdays 4:00 p.m., Room 104 Physics
Refreshments served at 3:40 p.m.


Colloquium organizer:
A.T. Le
(Link to main colloquium page)

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What the Library can do for you?

Come learn about the library resources you didn't know you can't live without. Do you know what MERLIN, MOBIUS, ILL, Compendex, OverDrive, Scholars’ Mine, Kanopy, LearningExpress or Scopus mean? Do you know how to find anything other than coffee in the library? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop devices for a hands-on session with a librarian who will enlighten you about everything the library can offer and answer any questions you might have.

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Title: The photoeffect revisited: Attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of atoms, nanoparticles, and surfaces

Title:  "A journey from physics to biology"

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A tale of two states: the complex relationship between superconductivity and magnetism in quantum materials

Abstract: Much of our current technology was enabled by our understanding of semiconductors, whose electrons behave collectively in a similar way as how an individual electron does. In contrast, a hallmark of quantum materials is the emergence of unusual collective electronic behaviors that give rise to fascinating phenomena with unique potential for novel applications. A posterchild is the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, by which materials carry electric currents without dissipation at relatively high temperatures. An important clue to elucidate this highly debated state of matter comes from the observation that it tends to appear in close proximity to the very different phenomenon of magnetism. These two states seem to live a love-hate relationship, displaying a mixture of competition and cooperation. In this talk, I will discuss new and exciting progress on this problem enabled by recent Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of an effective low-energy model.

Title: The Pursuit of Materials Research for Potential Energy Conversion Applications

Abstract: Thermoelectric devices allow for direct conversion between heat and electricity, providing important alternatives for green energy technologies. Yet the efficiency during such energy conversion is limited by the competition between high electrical conductance and low thermal conductance of the modules constructed by thermoelectric materials. In my talk I will report several approaches and directions that have been undertaken in the search for new materials and systems for potential energy conversion applications. For instance, as an example of incorporating both Kondo lattice hybridization and unstable valence states near the Fermi level, enhanced thermoelectric performance of heavy-fermion compounds YbTM2Zn20 (TM = Co, Rh, Ir) was achieved. This result shows that strongly hybridized f-electron intermetallic compounds coupled with “rattling” features in the cage-like structures offers a unique approach to high power factors while maintaining small thermal conductivity values -- ideal systems for thermoelectric applications.

 

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is supported by National Science Foundation through NSF/DMR-1644779 and the State of Florida.

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